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The Interactive Eye

How does the human eye work?

Find out with this expansive interactive guide from FeelGoodContacts.com!

Explore the eye

The Outer Eye

Optic Nerve

Sclera

Superior Oblique

Inferior Oblique

Inferior Rectus

Superior Rectus

Medial Rectus

Iris

Pupil

Cornea

Anterior Chamber

The outer eye is a wonder in miniature engineering. Hover over the 'i' icons to reveal more information about each part of the eye.

A hole located in the centre of the iris that allows light onto the retina inside the eye.

A thin, circular structure in the eye that controls the size of the pupil and the amount of light into the eye.

The transparent front part of the eye that covers and protects the iris, pupil and the anterior chamber between them.

This is the fluid space inside the eye between the cornea and the iris.

This is the white of the eye. It's a protective, fibrous, opaque layer that surrounds the eye.

A muscle that moves the eyeball upwards and towards the mid level of our sight.

A muscle that moves the eyeball downwards and towards the mid level of our sight.

A muscle that helps control eye movement left and right, along with the lateral radius on the other side.

A muscle under the inferior rectus that helps with eye movement and maintain stability in the eye.

A muscle under the superior rectus that helps with eye movement and maintain stability in the eye.

Transmits the electrical signals from the retina to the brain.

The Inner Eye

Optic Nerve

Retina

Hyaloid Canal

Iris

Lens

Pupil

Cornea

Anterior Chamber

Vitreous Humour

Choroid

Fovea

Optic Disc

Photoreceptors

Nerve Endings

How Do We See?

Take a Closer Look

Here is a cross-section of the eye. Hover over the icons to find out more about each eye part.

A hole located in the centre of the iris that allows light onto the retina inside the eye.

A thin, circular structure in the eye that controls the size of the pupil and the amount of light into the eye.

The transparent front part of the eye that covers and protects the iris, pupil and the anterior chamber between them.

This is the fluid space inside the eye between the cornea and the iris.

A light-sensitive layer of tissue, lining the inner surface of the eye.

A clear gel that fills the space between the lens and the retina.

A small transparent canal that runs through the vitreous body, the gap between the lens and retina.

A thin layer of tissue that lies between retina and the sclera. It provides oxygen to the retina and is only about 0.2mm at its thickest point.

Responsible for sharp, clear vision. It is a small depression in the surface of the retina and is about 1.5mm wide.

This is where the blood vessels enter the eye. There is no light sensitivity here.

Transmits the electrical signals from the retina to the brain.

A transparent, biconvex structure inside the eye that focuses light onto the retina.

Transmits the electrical signals from the retina to the photoreceptors.

Is made up of two types: Rods help with our vision in low light, while cones help with our vision in higher light levels. Cones also help us see colour.

Click here to see what happens when we see objects.

Click here to take a closer look at the retina.

How Do We See?

The Inner Eye

Short-sightedness Long-sightedness

Hover over the icons to reveal how the eye works.

Light is reflected from the objects we see and travels in a straight line to our eye.

Light travels through the lens which focuses it onto the back of the eye. The lens refracts the light, which turns the image upside down!

Photoreceptors in the retina translate the light into electrical impulses.

The optic nerve carries the electrical impulses to the brain where the image is turned the right way up.

Click here to see what happens in a shortsighted eye.

Click here to see what happens in a longsighted eye.

Click here to return to the inner eye.

Short-sightedness (Myopia)

In a short-sighted eye, the eye itself can be longer than normal. In some people, the cornea is more curved than normal. In either case, the light that passes through the lens is not focused onto the retina but a short distance in front of it, leading to a blurred image.

How We See

Click here to return to the 'how we see' section.

Long-sightedness (Hyperopia)

In a long-sighted eye, the eye itself is too short. It can also be caused when the cornea is either not curved enough or is too thick. The light that passes through the lens is not properly focused onto the retina. As a result, a long-sighted person is able to see distant objects clearly, but struggles to see nearby objects clearly.

How We See

Click here to return to the 'how we see' section.